What Are Feminized Cannabis Seeds & What Are They Used For?

Article Author: Atlas Seed
Article Posted: September 30, 2021

What are feminized seeds?

Feminized hemp and cannabis seeds are produced to grow primarily female plants, while regular hemp and cannabis seeds have a 50% chance of being female.  Since cannabis is a dioecious plant, it evenly produces male and female plants, or plants with male and female flowering parts.  The feminization process allows breeders and seed producers to create seed that is almost entirely female.  Though our exact recipe, frequency, and timing are proprietary, generally feminization is done with a colloidal silver spray.  

Producing primarily phenotypically presenting females is an efficient approach to streamlining the cultivation of cannabis and hemp flower.  Though there is no way to completely remove the risk of male plants pollinating and seeding female flowers (as least with normal, diploid cannabis), farmers and cultivators can save an enormous amount of production space and time by removing males from the equation at the beginning of the growth cycle of the cannabis plant. 

Not all feminized seeds are produced equally, since the execution of the process is easy to learn but tricky to master.  We’ve heard many anecdotal stories of fly by night seed producer lots producing 20-30% males, so apparently it’s a thing you can encounter if you’re not careful.  Atlas Seed feminization rates tend to range from 1:1000 to 1:4000, or 99.99% in either case.  These rates are comparable with the best produced feminized seed in the world.  To date we are not aware of anyone offering “100% feminized seed.”  Some breeders and producers allege that their feminized seed produces no males but will show a small amount of herms, which from the perspective of the grower is merely semantic, since we are in either case talking about pollen producing male parts that will seed your crop..  With Atlas Seed’s feminized cultivars, depending on the amount of plants you have per acre, you’ll basically end up with somewhere between 10-20 males per acre.  For more information on conducting a proper hunt for male and hermaphroditic plants, please see our male hunt guide here.